AskDefine | Define winded

The Collaborative Dictionary

Wind \Wind\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wound (wound) (rarely Winded); p. pr. & vb. n. Winding.] [OE. winden, AS. windan; akin to OS. windan, D. & G. winden, OHG. wintan, Icel. & Sw. vinda, Dan. vinde, Goth. windan (in comp.). Cf. Wander, Wend.] [1913 Webster]
To turn completely, or with repeated turns; especially, to turn about something fixed; to cause to form convolutions about anything; to coil; to twine; to twist; to wreathe; as, to wind thread on a spool or into a ball. [1913 Webster] Whether to wind The woodbine round this arbor. --Milton. [1913 Webster]
To entwist; to infold; to encircle. [1913 Webster] Sleep, and I will wind thee in arms. --Shak. [1913 Webster]
To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern. "To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus." --Shak. [1913 Webster] In his terms so he would him wind. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster] Gifts blind the wise, and bribes do please And wind all other witnesses. --Herrick. [1913 Webster] Were our legislature vested in the prince, he might wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure. --Addison. [1913 Webster]
To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate. [1913 Webster] You have contrived . . . to wind Yourself into a power tyrannical. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Little arts and dexterities they have to wind in such things into discourse. --Gov. of Tongue. [1913 Webster]
To cover or surround with something coiled about; as, to wind a rope with twine. [1913 Webster] To wind off, to unwind; to uncoil. To wind out, to extricate. [Obs.] --Clarendon. To wind up. (a) To coil into a ball or small compass, as a skein of thread; to coil completely. (b) To bring to a conclusion or settlement; as, to wind up one's affairs; to wind up an argument. (c) To put in a state of renewed or continued motion, as a clock, a watch, etc., by winding the spring, or that which carries the weight; hence, to prepare for continued movement or action; to put in order anew. "Fate seemed to wind him up for fourscore years." --Dryden. "Thus they wound up his temper to a pitch." --Atterbury. (d) To tighten (the strings) of a musical instrument, so as to tune it. "Wind up the slackened strings of thy lute." --Waller. [1913 Webster]
Wind \Wind\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Winded; p. pr. & vb. n. Winding.] [1913 Webster]
To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate. [1913 Webster]
To perceive or follow by the scent; to scent; to nose; as, the hounds winded the game. [1913 Webster]
(a) To drive hard, or force to violent exertion, as a horse, so as to render scant of wind; to put out of breath. (b) To rest, as a horse, in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe. [1913 Webster] To wind a ship (Naut.), to turn it end for end, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side. [1913 Webster]
Wind \Wind\, v. t. [From Wind, moving air, but confused in sense and in conjugation with wind to turn.] [imp. & p. p. Wound (wound), R. Winded; p. pr. & vb. n. Winding.] To blow; to sound by blowing; esp., to sound with prolonged and mutually involved notes. "Hunters who wound their horns." --Pennant. [1913 Webster] Ye vigorous swains, while youth ferments your blood, .

Word Net

winded adj : breathing laboriously or convulsively [syn: blown, gasping, out of breath(p), panting, pursy, short-winded]

English

Verb

winded
  1. past of wind In the context of "To cause a person to lose their breath":
    The boxer was winded when his opponent hit his solar plexus.

Adjective

  1. The state of being short of breath
    She was winded from her long run.

Derived terms

Air hunger is the sensation of the urge to breathe. It is usually caused by the detection of high levels of carbon dioxide in the blood by sensors in the carotid sinus and is one of the body's homeostatic mechanisms to ensure proper oxygenation. Natural chemicals in the blood such as epinephrine (adrenaline) can also induce an urge to breathe by a separate pathway. Insufficient pulmonary minute ventilation, a sustained breath-hold, constriction of the alveoli of the lungs as in asthma or high ambient levels of carbon dioxide in the air breathed can cause air hunger resulting in a respiratory distress condition characterized by dyspnea, labored breathing or gasping. Air hunger can be very distressing and triggers strong reactions to restore breathing.
In mammals (with the notable exception of seals and some burrowing mammals), the breathing reflex is triggered by excess of carbon dioxide rather than lack of oxygen, so asphyxiation progresses in oxygen-deprived environments, such as storage vessels purged with nitrogen or helium balloons, without the victim experiencing air hunger.
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